Top 10 Bizarre Societal Experiments Ever

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Some ideas start out small and become revolutions that change our lives in a meaningful way. They usually start with acts of courage and freedom in thought by some rare individual who gives other the push to ask and fight for a better world. Here are some examples of such experiments that have brought change in societies over time and some continue to do so even today:   1. Civil Disobedience Civil Disobedience Civil disobedience is the public act of willfully disobeying the law and/or the commands of an authority figure, to make a political statement. Participants expect to be arrested, and are frequently charged with crimes such as trespass, failure to disperse, or failure to obey an officer. The purpose of civil disobedience is to convey a political message, which is accomplished through increased media coverage of the issue. Civil disobedience is generally understood to be nonviolent. The dandi march, extremadura campaign in Spain, Rosa Park’s refusal to give up her seat, Singing revolution in Estonia, fight for the larzac are examples of such movements. This figures at the top because of its effectiveness to bring together the masses in their campaign to obtain their rights, even in a system which is meant to be as liberal as democracy or otherwise, without the use of undue bloodshed.   2. Advent of democracy Advent of democracy Democracy is a kind of government in which all eligible citizens participate equally. They are either directly or through elected representatives in the proposal, development, and creation of laws. The idea is to prevent authoritarian power with one person or a group of few individuals. In most modern democracies, the whole body of all eligible citizens remain the sovereign power but political power is exercised through elected representatives. This is called representative democracy. Furthermore, freedom of political expression, freedom of speech, and freedom of the press are considered to be essential rights that allow eligible citizens to be adequately informed and able to vote according to their own interests. Countries like Norway, Sweden, North America, and Australia are examples of high scoring democratized nations and the world is still continuing a rapid process of adapting to various forms of democracy over time with a further emphasis on elections.   3. Gay pride Gay pride Feminism is a collection of movements and ideologies aimed at defending equal political, economic, and social rights for women. This includes seeking to establish equal opportunities for women in education and employment. While feminists around the world have differed in goals depending on time, culture, and country, most Western feminist historians assert that all movements that work to obtain women’s rights should be considered feminist movements. Feminism is mainly focused on women’s issues, but because feminism seeks gender equality, bell hooks and other feminists have argued that men’s liberation is a necessary part of feminism, and that men are also harmed by sexism and gender roles.   4. Women’s Rights Women's rights Feminism is a collection of movements and ideologies aimed at defending equal political, economic, and social rights for women. This includes seeking to establish equal opportunities for women in education and employment. While feminists around the world have differed in goals depending on time, culture, and country, most Western feminist historians assert that all movements that work to obtain women’s rights should be considered feminist movements. Feminism is mainly focused on women’s issues, but because feminism seeks gender equality, bell hooks and other feminists have argued that men’s liberation is a necessary part of feminism, and that men are also harmed by sexism and gender roles.   5. Free culture free culture The free culture movement is a social movement that promotes the freedom to distribute and modify creative works in the form of free content by using the Internet and other forms of media. The movement objects to overly-restrictive copyright laws. Many members of the movement argue that such laws hinder creativity. They call this system “permission culture”. Creative Commons is a well-known website which was started by Lawrence Lessig. It lists licenses that permit sharing under various conditions, and also offers an online search of various creative-commons-licensed productions.  

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