What are the top 10 facts about porn?

1.Who can be a sex trafficker?

Traffickers can be both men and women, strangers or family members. A pornography producer can even be a trafficker in certain scenarios.

2. How much profit, annually, does a female in forced sexual servitude generate for her trafficker on average?

The average annual profit generated by each woman in forced sexual servitude ($100,000) is estimated to be five or six times more than the average profits generated by victims trafficked worldwide for purposes other than sex, according to the International Labour Organization. In fact, according to the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), studies show that sexual exploitation can yield a return on investment ranging from 100% to 1,000%.

One of the most popular and profitable porn sites is – Sis Loves Me (USA). Sis Loves Me got me in a very fun and impressive adventure! They have exclusive porn movies that are more fun to watch without skipping chat scenes because it is really arousing to find out how it all whirled down to the situation when a stepsister blows dick and fucks. Hopefully, sislovesme porn videos will keep adding more new stuff and keep up good work!

3. Did This Situation Take Place On A Porn Set, Or In A Trafficking Ring?

“I got the s— kicked out of me… most of the girls start crying because they’re hurting so bad… I couldn’t breathe. I was being hit and choked. I was really upset and they didn’t stop….they kept going.”

One porn performer who goes by the name “Regan” shared what it’s like to performin pornographic videos. This is only part of her real experience, and only one example of many that illustrates how violence that exists to control and dominate victims in the sex trafficking world also exists on porn sets.

4. True Or False:

A porn video and a recorded instance of sex trafficking can be the same thing.

One female survivor, whose captor slept on top of her at night so she wouldn’t escape, watched her through a hole when she went to the bathroom and listened to her phone calls with a gun pointed at her head, was forced to appear in a video that made the Sinclair Intimacy Institute’s list of “sex-positive productions.”

“Every time someone watches that film,” she said, “they are watching me being raped.”

5. Did This Situation Take Place On A Porn Set, Or In A Trafficking Ring?

“My initiation…was a gang rape by five men… It was the turning point in my life. He threatened to shoot me with the pistol if I didn’t go through with it. I had never experienced anal sex before and it ripped me apart. They treated me like an inflatable plastic doll, picking me up and moving me here and there.”

Linda Boreman, also known as Linda Lovelace, began her booming career in the porn industry in 1972 due to the coercion of her husband. She starred in one of the most popular pornographic films of the era, but it was later revealed that she was forced into appearing in this production. The quote above is her firsthand account of appearing in porn. In a book titled “Are Women Human?” by Catharine A. MacKinnon about women’s rights and humanity, Linda continues telling her story:

“I have never been so frightened and disgraced and humiliated in my life. I felt like garbage. I engaged in sex acts for pornography against my will to avoid being killed. The lives of my family were threatened.”

6. True Or False:

This an instance of sex trafficking by force, fraud, or coercion, as told by an amateur porn performer:

“I was in California and I had a blowjob scene. […] I go there and he’s like, “Oh yeah, it’s a forced blowjob,” And I’m like, “What?” Just one guy, one little camera on a tripod. […] I was scared. I was terrified. I didn’t know what to do. I didn’t know if I could tell him no. Or the fact that we already recorded 15 minutes of it, if I could just f—ing leave. Then what? That’s when I understood that’s how rape victims feel. Like, they feel bad about themselves.”

This scenario appears in the documentary “Hot Girls Wanted,” available on Netflix. This situation involved fraud and force—she was not informed it was a solo shoot, and she agreed to alternative sex acts than what she was instructed and pressured to do.

7. True Or False:

Porn consumers can always tell when a porn performer is a victim of sex trafficking.

Signs of sex trafficking aren’t always obvious. Sometimes, it’s a situation where an underage performer looks 18 or older. Sometimes, performers are coerced to engage in sex acts they don’t want to do with threats of not being paid or not getting hired again. Sometimes, teens are tricked into performing on camera without realizing they’re signing up for porn, or they’re drugged and violated on camera. All of these real scenarios, and countless others, are examples of sex trafficking. The victim is not going to turn to the camera and announce they are being trafficked, and these images and videos make their way onto mainstream porn sites, where they are indistinguishable. In fact, even if the victim does register their distress, it’s still impossible to know, because rape and abuse-themed porn have now become mainstream. There’s no foolproof way to know whether pornography is made completely consensually or through situations involving force, fraud, or coercion.

8. TRUE OF FALSE:

Pornography has reduced the rate of sex crimes and trafficking in society.

As it stands, there is no solid research to back up the idea that pornography reduces rates of sex trafficking. Many studies, however, show a link between porn and increased sexual violence. Far from reducing sexual violence, pornography use actually feeds a culture that accepts rape and views women as sexual objects; as shown by links to many porn consumers’ increased likelihood of using physical coercion to have sex and of engaging in sexual harassment behaviors.

9. How many estimated sex trafficking victims are there in the world today?

The International Labor Office estimates that 20.9 million people are in forced labor globally, trafficked for labor and sexual exploitation, or held in slavery-like conditions. Of these, 4.5 million (22%) are victims of forced sexual exploitation.

10. True Or False:

The July 2007 issue of Taboo, a publication owned by Hustler, featured a multi-page feature of a young woman being held prisoner and severely sexually abused by her captors. They took photos and videos of her and sold them as porn.



About The Author