Top 10 Words the Internet Has Given the English Language

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6. LOL

LOLs

If you type “LOL” or “lol”, you’re saying “laughing out loud”, unless you are a mother who used it to describe a death in the family. You’re offering a kind of stage direction: dramatizing the process of typing. It sounds simple, but this is part of a radical change in language. For the first time in history, we’re conducting conversations through written words (or, more precisely, through typing onto screens). And in the process we’re expending immense effort on making words and symbols express the emotional range of face-to-face interactions. Yet it’s all, also, performance; a careful crafting of appearances that can bear little resemblance to reality.

You will also see variations like LOLZ (a version of LOL, ROFL (Rolling on Floor Laughing), and ROFLMAO (Rolling on Floor, Laugh My Ass Off). In the United Kingdom, PMSL is also a popular version of LOL.

 

7. Spam
Spam

The most enduring gift of British comedy series Monty Python’s Flying Circus may prove to be a digital one: the term “spam”. The key episode, first broadcast in 1970, featured a sketch called “SPAM”: the brand name used since 1937 by the Hormel Foods Corporation as a contraction of the phrase spiced ham. Set in a cafe where almost every single item on the menu featured spam, the sketch culminated in a chorus of Viking warriors drowning everyone else’s voices out by chanting the word “spam”.  A satirical indictment of British culinary monotony, it took on a second life during the early 1980s, when those who wished to derail early online discussions copied out the same words repeatedly in order to clog up a debate. Inspired by Python, the word spam proved a popular way of doing this. “Spamming” came to describe any process of drowning out “real” content – and the rest is repetitive history.

 

 

8. Meh
MMeh

The origins of the word “meh” are not known, however, sources have said that the origins can be traced from the aberdeen and embassy area of Woodbridge Ontario and also from the downtown core of Brantford, Ontario. The exact defintion of the word meh has also not yet been established, however, it is often used in the context of “I dont know” or “I dont care”. It has been recognized as a wonder of the world, due to its amazing capaiblity of changing meanings often. more information will be posted once the proper definition has been uncovered along with examples.

 

9. Geeks
Geeks

“Geek” arrived in English from Low German, in which a geck denoted a crazy person; in traveling circuses, the geek show traditionally involved a performer biting off the heads of live chickens. By 1952, the sense of a freakishly adept technology enthusiast had appeared in science fiction

Today, the word is now associated with contemporary student and computer slang, as in computer geek. In fact, geek is first attested in 1876 with the meaning “fool,” and it later also came to mean “a performer engaging in bizarre acts like biting the head off a live chicken.” Perhaps the use of geek to describe a circus sideshow has contributed to the popularity it enjoys today. The circus was a much more significant source of entertainment in the United States in the 19th and early 20th centuries than it is now, and large numbers of traveling circuses left a cultural legacy in various unexpected ways. Superman and other comic book superheroes owe much of their look to circus acrobats, who were similarly costumed in capes and tights. We also owe the word ballyhoo to the circus; its ultimate origin is unknown, but in the late 1800s it referred to a flamboyant free musical performance conducted outside a circus with the goal of luring customers to buy tickets to the shows inside.

 

10. Cupertino Effect
Cupertinos

Also known as “auto-correct errors”, a Cupertino error typically occurs when your computer thinks it is smarter than you in terms of spelling. The name comes from an early spell checker program, which knew the word Cupertino – the Californian city where Apple has its headquarters – but not the word “cooperation”. All the cooperations in a document might thus be automatically “corrected” into Cupertinos. Courtesy of smart phones, such as iPhone, Cupertinos have much richer field  – a personal favorite being my smartphone’s determination to transform “Facebook” into “ravenous”.

Foreign words are easily affected by the Cupertino effect, as when a California lawyer submitted a brief in which the Latin phrase sua sponte (’of one’s own accord’) had unfortunately been changed to sea sponge.euters story from today appears to have fallen victim to an overzealous spellchecker, resulting in an enjoyable typo. Or someone over there hates the British monarchy.

With its highly evolved social structure of tens of thousands of worker bees commanded by Queen Elizabeth, the honey bee genome could also improve the search for genes linked to social behavior . .

“Queen Elizabeth has 10 times the lifespan of workers and lays up to 2,000 eggs a day.”

 LOLZ

 

10. Geeks
Geeks“Geek” arrived in English from Low German, in which a geck denoted a crazy person; in traveling circuses, the geek show traditionally involved a performer biting off the heads of live chickens. By 1952, the sense of a freakishly adept technology enthusiast had appeared in science fiction

Today, the word is now associated with contemporary student and computer slang, as in computer geek. In fact, geek is first attested in 1876 with the meaning “fool,” and it later also came to mean “a performer engaging in bizarre acts like biting the head off a live chicken.” Perhaps the use of geek to describe a circus sideshow has contributed to the popularity it enjoys today. The circus was a much more significant source of entertainment in the United States in the 19th and early 20th centuries than it is now, and large numbers of traveling circuses left a cultural legacy in various unexpected ways. Superman and other comic book superheroes owe much of their look to circus acrobats, who were similarly costumed in capes and tights. We also owe the word ballyhoo to the circus; its ultimate origin is unknown, but in the late 1800s it referred to a flamboyant free musical performance conducted outside a circus with the goal of luring customers to buy tickets to the shows inside.

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